PRESS RELEASES / February 5, 2019

Legislators Taking the Permanent Out of Permanent Early Voter List Republican Bill Would Purge People From PEVL Without Warning

For Immediate Release

Contact: Emily Kirkland, emily@progressnowarizona.org


Phoenix
– Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita isn’t slowing down in her efforts to make Arizona’s elections less efficient and more confusing. Her latest bill, SB 1188, is in Senate Judiciary Committee this Thursday. It would purge voters from the permanent early voting list if they don’t vote in two consecutive elections. SB 1188 would force these purged PEVL voters to cast their ballots in-person, which would increase pressure on polling places and discourage many from voting entirely. Her bill doesn’t require the counties to notify the voter that they’ve been removed, likely resulting in additional confusion for counties and voters alike.

What: Defend Our Voting Rights (Again)

When: Thursday February 5, 9am

Where: Arizona State Capitol, Senate Hearing Room 109

Who: Arizona Advocacy Network, Indivisible Arizona, ProgressNow Arizona, Arizona Coalition for Change, LUCHA, Mi Familia Vota Arizona, NextGen Arizona, League of Women Voters Arizona, CASE (Central Arizonans for a Sustainable Economy), and the Arizona AFL-CIO will all be present to voice opposition to the bill.

More Background on SB 1188:

  • Receiving a ballot in the mail makes voting more convenient and accessible. This is why about 80 percent of Arizona voters (2.9 million) receive ballots in the mail.
  • SB 1188 would remove at least 250,000 voters from PEVL using most recent elections data.
  • Removing them from PEVL would significantly lower their likelihood of voting as shown by higher turnout in states and counties that mail all voters ballots.
  • These voters—who have demonstrated interest in civic life by opting into PEVL but for whatever reason haven’t voted recently—are most in need of encouragement and outreach to vote. Canceling their early ballots instead sends the message that these at-risk voters’ voices are no longer wanted.

SHARE